Paul Selles

Computers and cats

Tag Archives: Microsoft Team Foundation Server

TFS API: TFS User Email Address Lookup and Reverse Lookup

Occasionally I need to develop a tool that requires sending and receiving emails to and from developers. To do this I will need to lookup email addresses based on a TFS user’s display or account name and vice versa. Lucky for us this is painfully easy to do using IIdentityManagementService.ReadIdentity and the TeamFoundationIdentity class [1][2]:

private static readonly string TeamProjectUriString = "http://tfs.yourtfsurl.com";

// Team Project Collection getter
private static TfsTeamProjectCollection _tfsTeamProjectCollection;
public static TfsTeamProjectCollection TfsTeamProjectCollection
{
    get
    {
        return _tfsTeamProjectCollection ??
               (_tfsTeamProjectCollection = new TfsTeamProjectCollection(new Uri(TeamProjectUriString)));
    }
}

// Identity Management Service getter
private static IIdentityManagementService _identityManagementService;
public static IIdentityManagementService IdentityManagementService
{
    get
    {
        return _identityManagementService ??
               (_identityManagementService = TfsTeamProjectCollection.GetService<IIdentityManagementService>());
    }
}

// Get Email Address from TFS Account or Display Name
public static string GetEmailAddress(string userName)
{
    TeamFoundationIdentity teamFoundationIdentity =
        IdentityManagementService.ReadIdentity(
            IdentitySearchFactor.AccountName | IdentitySearchFactor.DisplayName,
            userName,
            MembershipQuery.None,
            ReadIdentityOptions.None);

    return teamFoundationIdentity.GetAttribute("Mail", null);
}

// Get TFS Display Name from and Email Address
public static string GetDisplayName(string emailAddress)
{
    TeamFoundationIdentity teamFoundationIdentity =
        IdentityManagementService.ReadIdentity(
            IdentitySearchFactor.MailAddress,
            emailAddress,
            MembershipQuery.None,
            ReadIdentityOptions.None);

    return teamFoundationIdentity.DisplayName;
}

References

[1] IIdentityManagementService.ReadIdentity Method. MSDN

[2] TeamFoundationIdentity Class. MSDN

Renaming File with Team Foundation Server API: Extending Workspace to Rename a Large Group of Files

The Problem

We have TFS check-in policies that will enforce naming conventions for certain files. The policy will allow the developer to programmatically rename any files that do not match the acceptable naming convention. Behind the scene the renaming is done using the WorkSpace.PendRename method [1]. This policy works fine for one or two files but for a large number of files we start having performance issues. Anyone who has experience renaming multiple files on TFS knows that it is a painfully slow ordeal. So how can we speed it up.

The Solution

I have solved this issue through the use of extending methods in the Microsoft.TeamFoundation.VersionControl.Client.Workspace class, and incorporating Task Parallelism [2][3][4]. Since the original Workspace.PendRename returns the number of files that it has renamed as an Int32, we want to make sure that we preserve that functionality.  I have only created a solution for the Workspace.PendRename(string,string) case since this is the only variation of the method that I am currently using; to expand this to all Workspace.PendRename implementations is trivial.

This the extended method:

public static class WorkSpaceExtension
{
    // Extend PendRename(String, String)
    public static int PendRename(this Workspace workspace,
        string[] oldPaths,
        string[] newPaths)
    {
        // Make sure that the oldPath and new Paths match
        if (oldPaths.Count() != newPaths.Count())
            throw new ArgumentException("Every oldPath must have corresponding newPath");

        // This list will contain all our tasks
        List pendRenameTasks = new List();

        // Loop throuh all newPath and oldPath pairs
        for (int i = 0; i < oldPaths.Count(); i++)
        {
            // Add each new task in out task container
            pendRenameTasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew((Object obj) =>
            {
                // We are going to pass the current old path and the
                // current new path into the path as an anonymous type
                var path = (dynamic)obj;
                return workspace.PendRename(path.oldPath, path.newPath);
            }, new { oldPath = oldPaths[i], newPath = newPaths[i] }));
        }

        // Wait for all tasks to complete
        Task.WaitAll(pendRenameTasks.ToArray());

        // Sum up the result of all the original PendRename method
        int taskCount=0;
        foreach (Task pendRenameTask in pendRenameTasks)
        {
            taskCount += pendRenameTask.Result;
        }

        // Return the number of file names changed
        return taskCount;
    }
}

References

[1] Workspace.PendRename Method. MSDN Library.

[2] Extension Methods (C# Programming Guide). MSDN Library.

[3] WorkSpace Class. MSDN Library.

[4] Extension Methods (C# Programming Guide). MSDN Library.

Team Foundation Server API: Programmatically Downloading Files From Source Control

For several of my custom check-in polices, I need to compare the developer’s local copy to a server copy of the same file. The challenge then becomes how to I find and download a file from source control programmatically using the Team Foundation Server API.

Finding the Server Items in Source Control

The first thing that you need to do is find file on the source control server that we want to download, all our searches will return an Item object or an ItemSet object (I will call this object our Server Item) [1][2]. This Server Item can be found multiple ways for example, the Item ID, the Server Item path, the Local Item Path, the Changeset Number, the Changeset Owner, or a Date Range.

Server Item Path Within Custom Check-in Policies

Within my custom check-in policy the path and ID of our Server Item can be easily found from the IPendingCheckin Interface, within the PendingChange array IPendingCheckinPendingChanges.CheckedPendingChanges Property (IPendingCheckin.PendingChanges.CheckedPendingChanges) [3][4][5]. Each CheckedPendingChanges will reference a PendingChange object that is associated with each checked out, included item. The PendingChange.ServerItem Property gives us the path to our Server Item and the PendingChange.ItemId Property gives us the Server Item ID [6][7].

Creating an Instance of VersionControlServer

All our Server Item Queries are done using VersionControlServer object and all methods mentioned below are fromthe VersionControlServer class [8]. First we need an instance of VersionControlServer:

string teamProjectCollectionUrl = "https://YourTfsUrl.com/tfs/YourTfsProjectCollection";

TfsTeamProjectCollection teamProjectCollection = TfsTeamProjectCollectionFactory.GetTeamProjectCollection(new Uri(teamProjectCollectionUrl));
VersionControlServer versionControlServer = teamProjectCollection.GetService<VersionControlServer>();

GetItem Method

The VersionControlServer.GetItem Method have several options, but the first three are the ones that I most commonly use [9]. They are:

Examples of usage:

// Get the latest Item for local path "C:\projects\myfiles.cs"
Item item1 = versionControlServer.GetItem("C:\projects\myfiles.cs");

// Get ItemId = 12345 for changesetId = 54321
Item item2 = versionControlServer.GetItem(12345,54321);

// Get the latest Item for server path "$/ProjectName/myfile.cs"
Item item1 = versionControlServer.GetItem("$/ProjectName/myfile.cs", VersionSpec.Latest);

GetItems Method

The VersionControlServer.GetItems methods are very similar to the GetItem methods with the exception that it will return a collection of Server Items [11]. The most useful GetItems methods I have found, are those that provide a RecursionType option to get a collection Server Items within a directory structure [12].

QueryHistory Method

The added benefit of using VersionControlServer.QueryHistory Method is to use the QueryHistoryParameters [13][14]. QueryHistoryParameters allows for substantial customization of our search parameters, for example, if we wanted to download the the content of a project file a the time of a given Changeset that is not associated with the project file, we could. Since the project file in this example is not referenced to that particular Changeset, we will have to perform our query based on the DateTime of the Changeset.

// Example ChangsetNumber and ServerItemPath
int changesetNumber = 12345;
string serverItemPath = "$/ProjectName/myproject.csproj";

// Get the changeset for a given Changeset Number
Changeset changeset = versionControlServer.GetChangeset(changesetNumber);

// Create a queryHistoryParameters class based on our desired project file server path
QueryHistoryParameters queryHistoryParameters = mew QueryHistoryParameters(serverItemPath,RecursionType.None);

// We want to sort descending
queryHistoryParameters.SortAscending = false;

// Interested only one result
queryHistoryParameters.MaxResults = 1;

// Set the version end date to that of the changeset date
queryHistoryParameters.VersionEnd = new DateVersionSpec(changeset.CreationDate);

// Perform Query
ItemSet items = versionControlServer.QueryHistory(queryHistoryParameters);

Downloading the Sever Item Content

Once we have the specific Item or ItemSet of interest it’s just a matter of downloading the file contents locally. This process is quite simple and my methods make uses of the Stream and MemoryStream [15][16]. After some difficulties with the downloaded file’s encoding I use StreamReader to download the Server Item to a string [17]. Here is the method I use to retrieve the Server Item as a byte array:

public byte[] GetFileByteArray(Item item)
{  
	// create a container
	byte[] content;

	// Download file into stream
	using (Stream stream = item.DownloadFile())
	{
		// Use MemoryStream to copy steam into a byte array
		using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
		{
			stream.CopyTo(memoryStream);
			content = memoryStream.ToArray();
		}
	}

	// return byte array
	return content;       
}

Here is the method I use to retrieve the Server Item as a string:

public string GetFileString(Item item)
{
	// Setup string container
	string content  = string.Empty;

	// Download file into stream
	using (Stream stream = item.DownloadFile())
	{
		// Use MemoryStream to copy downloaded Stream
		using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
		{
			stream.CopyTo(memoryStream);
                   
			// Use StreamReader to read MemoryStream created from byte array
			using (StreamReader streamReader = new StreamReader(new MemoryStream(memoryStream.ToArray())))
			{
				content = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
			}
		}
	}

	// return string
	return content ;
}

Putting it all Together

With our new found knowledge we can create a simple console application that will retrieve the latest version for a given file.

using System;
using Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Client;
using Microsoft.TeamFoundation.VersionControl.Client;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string teamProjectCollectionUrl = "https://YourTfsUrl/tfs/YourTeamProjectCollection";
            string filePath = @"C:\project\myfile.cs";

            // Get the version control server
            TfsTeamProjectCollection teamProjectCollection = TfsTeamProjectCollectionFactory.GetTeamProjectCollection(new Uri(teamProjectCollectionUrl));
            VersionControlServer versionControlServer = teamProjectCollection.GetService<VersionControlServer>();

            // Get the latest Item for filePath
            Item item = versionControlServer.GetItem(filePath, VersionSpec.Latest);

            // Download and display content to console
            string fileString = string.Empty;

            using (Stream stream = item.DownloadFile())
            {
                using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
                {
                    stream.CopyTo(memoryStream);
                   
                    // Use StreamReader to read MemoryStream created from byte array
                    using (StreamReader streamReader = new StreamReader(new MemoryStream(memoryStream.ToArray())))
                    {
                        fileString = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
                    }
                }
            }

            Console.WriteLine(fileString);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

Paul

Reference

[1] Item Class. MSDN Library

[2] ItemSet Class. MSDN Library

[3] IPendingCheckin Interface. MSDN Library

[4] PendingChange Class. MSDN Libary

[5] IPendingCheckinPendingChanges.CheckedPendingChanges Property. MSDN Library

[6] PendingChange.ServerItem Property. MSDN Library

[7] PendingChange.ItemId Property. MSDN Library

[8] VersionControlServer Class. MSDN Library

[9] VersionControlServer.GetItem Method. MSDN Library

[10] VersionSpec Class. MSDN Library

[11] VersionControlServer.GetItems Method. MSDN Library

[12] RecursionType Enumeration. MSDN Library

[13] VersionControlServer.QueryHistory Method. MSDN Library

[14] QueryHistoryParameters Class. MSDN Library

[15] Stream Class. MSDN Library

[16] MemoryStream Class. MSDN Library

[17] StreamReader Class. MSDN Library

TFS 2012: WorkItemChangedEventHandler and where is WorkItemChangedEvent

I am creating a custom action for our TFS2012 Work Item for State Transitions. I found a multitude of resources on how the get the ball rolling create a WorkItemChangedEventHandler class [1]; but I quickly hit a snag. I could not find WorkItemChangedEvent for the life of me. I was expecting to find WorkItemChangedEvent in the assembly Microsoft.TeamFoundation.WorkItemTracking.Server but due to a poorly documented reason there are some dependencies with the assembly Microsoft.TeamFoundation.WorkItemTracking.Server.Dataaccesslayer. Both assemblies must be present to access any members of Microsoft.TeamFoundation.WorkItemTracking.Server.

Both of these assemblies can be found on the TFS2012 Server machine under the path %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Team Foundation Server 11.0\Application Tier\Web Services\bin.

 

Reference

[1] Jakob Ehn. Developing and debugging Server Side Event Handlers in TFS 2010. 23-Jan-2012

Tfs Build: Query Build Table for historical Build Status, Compilation Status, and Test Status

If you are having trouble finding historical build data using the TFS API, build information can be found in your Team Foundation Server Databases [1]. The table Tbl_Build keeps a log of all your historical builds including, build number, start and stop times, controller id, drop location, and statuses. This can be and extremely powerful tool to look up Build Id values to look up historic build logs which contain detailed reports (as covered in Tfs Build Log: Querying Build Log Data).

You can find the Tbl_Build table within your Collection database (Tfs_YourTeamProjectCollection, where YourTeamProjectCollection is the name of your Team Project Collection.) The Status columns that we are interested in are BuildStatus, CompilationStatus, and TestStatus as seen in the SQl Server Management Studio screen capture below:

Tbl_Build_Columns

The BuildStatus column values map to the Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.Client BuildStatus Enumeration [2]. Here is the Database specific table:

BuildStatus Description
1 InProgress
2 Succeeded
4 PartiallySucceeded
8 Failed
16 Stopped

The CompliationStatus and TestStatus columns are trickier to deal with than BuildStatus column. Where the BuildStatus is pretty well self explanatory, both the CompliationStatus and TestStatus are heavily based on user definitions within the Build Process Template. That is to say that a Complitation/Test failure may not mean what you think that it means out of the box. Please review your Build Process Template and see how the CompliationStatus and TestStatus are set.

Moving forward, both CompliationStatus and TestStatus columns map to the Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.Client BuildPhaseStatus Enumeration [3]. Here are the Database specific table:

CompliationStatus Description
1 Failed
2 Succeeded
NULL Unknown
TestStatus Description
1 Failed
2 Succeeded
NULL Unknown

We can now query the database for historical build information, for example we can look for all failed builds between Jan 5th and Jan 18th of this year:

SELECT * FROM [Tfs_YouTeamProjectCollection].[dbo].[Tbl_Build] 
WHERE [BuildStatus]=8 
AND [StartTime] BETWEEN '1/5/2013 12:00:00 AM' 
	AND '1/18/2013 12:00:00 AM'

Be sure to check this out my previous post Tfs Build Log: Querying Build Log Data to learn how to programmatically read historical build data.

References

[1] Team Foundation Server Databases. MSDN Library.

[2] BuildStatus Enumeration. MSDN Libary.

[3] BuildPhaseStatus Enumeration. MSDN Libary.

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